Schedule Data Refresh for SSAS Connected Excel Workbooks with PowerPivot for SharePoint

Using Excel Services, SharePoint users have been able to share workbooks that are connected to back end data since SharePoint 2007. Typically, the connection is made to SQL Server, or to Analysis services although a wide variety of sources are available. It’s also possible to publish individual components from these workbooks anywhere within the site collection through the Excel Web Access web part. Users can navigate to a dashboard page that contains all sorts of elements including an Excel chart that is connected to back end data. Well, to be precise, it was connected to back end data, the last time the workbook was saved. The workbook itself can be refreshed, but only manually.

When you open an Excel workbook in a browser through Excel services, by default, you’ll see the visualizations and any stored data in precisely the way that the workbook was when it was last saved. If you need to see more up to date data, you can select “Refresh Connections”. If (and sometimes that’s a big if) the server and connections are set up properly, the server will fetch updated data and update the workbook.

 This works well enough, but the problem is that when you, or anyone else opens the workbook again, they’ll still see the old version of the workbook, and will need to manually refresh the date again. In addition, any visualizations published elsewhere on a dashboard will also continue to show old data unless manually refreshed. If the amount of data is significant, this poses a serious performance issue to the server(s). There’s also a significant usability impact in that it’s a pretty big ask of an end user to have them constantly hitting a refresh button.

To get around this issue, one option is to set the refresh options in the data connections of the workbook. Excel Services respects these options. There are two settings that we need to be aware of, periodic refresh, and refresh on open. Connection properties can be accessed within the Excel client by selecting the Data tab, choosing Connections, then highlighting the connection in question and selecting Properties.

Periodic refresh will allow the workbook to be automatically refreshed in the background while it is opened in the browser. This can be useful when the source data is changing frequently. Refresh on opening will have the greatest impact in our scenario, as it will automatically refresh the data in the workbook whenever the file is opened. This will also work with published objects (Excel Web Access web parts) – every time that the web part is opened, the data will be automatically refreshed. This solves the usability problem above because the user no longer needs to manually update the data. However, it does not affect the server load problem.

Due to the fact that the data and visualizations retain the state that they had when the workbook was last saved, it also affects search. When the search indexer runs, it will only index the data that is saved in the workbook. It has no means of refreshing the data. Finally, in addition to the load imposed on the servers by constant refreshes, if the quantity of data being refreshed is large, users can experience significant lags when loading the file. This obviously introduces another usability option. While the refresh options in Excel are helpful, they don’t fully solve the problem. What is needed is a way to automatically open the file for editing, refresh the data, and resave it to SharePoint.

If you have ever used Power Pivot for SharePoint, you know that it can do exactly that. Power Pivot for SharePoint contains two primary elements – a specialized instance of SQL Server Analysis Services that allows users to interact with workbooks that contain embedded PowerPivot models, and a SharePoint service application that among other things, keeps those embedded models refreshed. Using the PowerPivot Gallery (enabled when PowerPivot for SharePoint is installed), you can configure a workbook’s refresh options by clicking on the icon in the Gallery view, or by selecting “Manage PowerPivot Data Refresh” in the simple All Documents view.

 Data Refresh options in PowerPivot Gallery View

 Data Refresh options in All Documents View

Once configured, the PowerPivot for SharePoint Service will refresh the data model in the workbook on a periodic basis (no more than once per day). The service essentially opens the workbook in edit mode, refreshes all of the data connections, and saves the workbook back to the library. If versioning is enabled, it will be saved as a new version. Unfortunately, if you’re not using a PowerPivot data model, the options are unavailable. In Gallery view, the icons are simply unavailable, and while the option is available in the All Documents view, selecting it results in an error.

On the surface, it would seem that using workbooks with PowerPivot is the only option for keeping large volumes of back-end data up to date in Excel visualizations. However, there is a small loophole that you can take advantage of.

The refresh function in PowerPivot for SharePoint refreshes all of the connections in a workbook. While this option is unavailable if the workbook has no embedded PowerPivot model, when it does, it refreshes ALL of the data connections in the workbook, whether they connect to a model, a back end SSAS server, SQL server or whatever. So therefore, if you want to keep your connected data refreshed, the solution is to add a dummy PowerPivot model to your workbook.

Simply open up the PowerPivot window, import some small amount of data from an external source, and save it. Once saved, the PowerPivot refresh options will appear, and you’ll be able to schedule data refresh for your workbook. You can even deselect the refresh of the source data for your dummy model, and the other connections will work just fine.

Once your workbooks are being updated automatically, your users will be presented with up-to date data on load with no delays, all dashboard visualizations will be up to date and quick to render, and the visible data will be picked up by your search crawler. All will be well with the world.

2 thoughts on “Schedule Data Refresh for SSAS Connected Excel Workbooks with PowerPivot for SharePoint

  1. Pingback: SharePoint 2013: Recopilatorio de enlaces interesantes (LXIII)! - Blog de Juan Carlos González en Geeks.MS

  2. Andri

    Do you know how and if scheduled data refresh will work the same with Sharepoint 2016 and Office Online Server 2016?

    Best regards,
    Andri

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