Power BI Desktop Excel Connections

Using Excel Files with Power BI Desktop and SharePoint

As discussed in a previous post, Working with Excel Files in the Power BI Service, Excel and Power BI have a rich, complex relationship. Power BI Desktop is the primary design tool for Power BI, and it has many feature overlaps with Excel as an analytic tool. Excel can be used both as an analytic tool and a data source, and the structure of the Excel file will dictate the way that Power BI Desktop can be used with it. If Excel is being used as an analytic tool (i.e. connected to data), the appropriate items in the file can be imported into Power BI Desktop. If it is being used as a data source (data in worksheets), Power BI Desktop will connect to it, and use its data to build a model. This post attempts to articulate the nuances of both scenarios.

Importing from Excel

Power BI Desktop has an unfortunate name in my opinion. It is a design tool and is not meant to replicate the capabilities of the Power BI service on the desktop, as the name might suggest. A better name for the product would I believe be Power BI Designer. Its purpose is to connect to and transform data (Power Query), build data models for Analysis (Power Pivot) and build reports (report designer).

Used as an analysis tool, Excel has all these capabilities as well. In fact, the first two (Power Query and Power Pivot) are identical to what is already in Power BI Desktop. Excel also has Power View for analytic reporting. Power View is very similar to the type of reporting in Power BI Desktop, but uses a different technology and has been deprecated for some time. As a result, Excel charts and pivot tables are the primary means of visualizing data in Excel.

So why would you need to use Power BI Desktop if you are using Excel? As explained in my previous post, the Power BI service can fully interact with Excel as an analysis tool, and allows you to interact with Excel right from the Power BI Service. If Excel is meeting all your analytics needs, then there may be no need to introduce Power BI Desktop at all. However, if you wish to take advantage of Power BI’s analytic reporting capabilities, and you have existing Excel assets, you may wish to convert them to the native Power BI format.  Whatever the reason, moving from Excel to Power BI is relatively straightforward with Power BI Desktop.

From the File menu in Power BI Desktop, select Import, and then Excel Workbook Contents.

Importing Excel Files contents

You are then prompted to select an Excel file. Once selected, you are then presented with a warning dialog.

Excel files contents warning dialog

The dialog does a very good job of explaining what will happen, specifically the fact that data from workbooks will not be brought into this new file. Any Power Pivot data models or Power Queries will be brought in. If the workbook contains legacy Power View sheets, they will be converted to native Power BI visuals. In addition, any legacy (non-Power Query) data connections used by the source file’s Power Pivot data model will be converted to Power Query and imported.

Imported Power View sheet

Legacy Power View Sheet converted to Power BI visuals

A complete list of workbook content and what is/isn’t converted is below:

Excel Content Import to PBI Desktop Support
Data in sheets Not imported
Data model (Power Pivot) Imported
Data connections Converted to Power Query and imported
Power Queries Imported
Power View Sheets Converted to PBI visuals and imported
Pivot charts/tables Not imported
Excel charts Not imported
Macros Not imported

Once imported, the new Power BI file (PBIX) lives on its own and contains no connection or any other type of relationship to the original source Excel file. If the source Excel file is changed, there is no way to update the PBIX file. Any imported data connections are between the PBIX file and the original data source. The new PBIX file can be published to the Power BI service like any other.

Connecting to Excel

Connecting to Excel as a data source is a very different thing than importing from it. In this scenario, the data in the worksheets and only the data in the worksheets is brought into the data model. The is very different behaviour than that of connecting to Excel files to the Power BI Service, where both the model and the worksheet data is brought in.

Using the Excel Connector

The easiest, and most obvious way to connect to Excel worksheet data is by using the Excel connector. From the ribbon in Power BI Desktop, select Get Data. The Excel connector is right at the top of the list.

Connecting to Excel files on the file system

Selecting it allows you select your source file, and then the workbooks within it, and then build out the data model.

This approach works well but carries with it an important limitation. The new queries are  connected to the file using a local file system. This means that to be refreshed, an on-premises data gateway is required. In order to eliminate the gateway requirement, you can connect to the file in SharePoint using the SharePoint folder connector.

Using the SharePoint Folder Connector

The SharePoint Folder connects to all the files stored in libraries of a SharePoint site. It allows you to report on file metadata, but it also allows you to drill into file contents.

From Power BI Desktop select Get Data but instead of selecting Excel, Search for SharePoint and select SharePoint folder.

Using the SharePoint folder connector

Once selected, enter the URL of the SharePoint site (NOT the URL of a library or folder) in the dialog box.

Next, you will be presented with a preview of all the files in your site. Unless you are only interested in file metadata, click on the Edit button to bring up the Power Query editor.

The initial view will contain all the files in the site, but we are interested in the content of just one of those files. Every file in this view will contain the hyperlinked value “Binary” in the Content column. Clicking that link for the file that you want to connect to will drill down into the contents.

Site contents using the SharePoint folder connector

From this level, you can build your Power Query, data model, and report as needed just as if you had used the Excel connector. The difference is that now when you publish your report to Power BI, it will know the file is stored in SharePoint and will connect directly to it. It will not require a gateway for refresh purposes. Once credentials are registered, the report will refresh itself directly from the workbook stored in SharePoint.

XLS vs XLSX

A note of caution. The above SharePoint folder approach only works for XLSX files. The Power BI Desktop and the Power BI service both support both Excel file formats (XLS and XLSX). However, refresh does not. If the source file format is XLS, and a refresh is attempted, you will receive the classic “microsoft.ace.oledb.12.0 provider” error in the Power BI service.

Excel files refresh error with XLS file types

The older Excel file format (XLS) requires an Access driver to refresh, which is not a part of the Power BI service. The newer XLSX file does not require this driver. As a result, if the source file is XLS, refreshing it requires going through an On-Premises Data gateway, and that gateway machine must also have the ACE components installed.

To recap, you can bring Excel assets into Power BI Desktop by using the import function, and you can load data from Excel files through Power Query. The two operations have very different results, and the can be combined if a source workbook contains both analyses and data.

2 thoughts on “Using Excel Files with Power BI Desktop and SharePoint

  1. Pingback: Power BI Release Notes, Visual filters, RLS and more... (August 6, 2018) | Guy in a Cube

  2. Demetrio Silva

    Agree about the bad name for Power BI Desktop. This cause a lot of confusion on the users.

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