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Working with Time Zones in the Power BI Relative Time Slicer and Filter

In the April 2020 release of Power BI Desktop, A new preview feature was debuted which provides an easy way to filter your report down to a rolling time period through the relative time slicer and filter. If you’ve tried this feature, you may have noticed that the results are not exactly what you might expect, unless you live in a very specific time zone. This article will show you how to design around this behaviour.

The problem is that the relative time that is evaluated by these two controls is always evaluated against UTC times. It assumes therefore that the time that you provide to it is also in UTC. If you are a report author working with local time values in a single location, this behaviour may seem confusing. Both the filter and the slicer work the same way, so for our purposes we’ll just be showing the filter here.

As an example of this, I collect data from a weather sensor in 1 minute increments, and have done so for several months. I have a report that shows the temperature over time, and I want to build a report page that shows this information for the past 24 hours. The relative time filter, applied to the page is the perfect control for doing this. It should also be noted here that this data is collected in the Eastern Time Zone, which in the summer (as I write) is offset from UTC time by -4 hours. The result is a report page that looks something like the below, with the filter applied.

You ca see above that although the current time is 9:39 AM, and a 24 hour relative time filter is applied, we are only seeing results after 1:39 PM from the previous day. This is because the supplied value for time is local, not UTC, and 9:39 AM EDT corresponds to 1:39 PM UTC. The filter is working, but it’s not showing the results that we expected.

The solution to this problem is straightforward, we need to use a different field that has bee converted to UTC for the filter, while continuing to display local time in the chart. There are many ways to do this with Power BI, the best will depend on your model design, but if you want to make the change using DAX, you can create a calculated column with a formula similar to:

TimeFieldUTC = TimeFieldLocal + UTCOffset/24

In my specific case above (EDT), the formula is:

ReadingTimeUTC = Time + 4/24

Another approach is to use Power Query to create a new column at refresh time. The Power Query new column formula to do the equivalent is:

[TimeFieldLocal] + #duration(0,UTCOffset,0,0)

Or again, in my specific case:

[Time] + #duration(0,4,0,0)

Once you have your corresponding UTC time values, simply replace the relative time filter fields with that field. The filter will be comparing UTC values to UTC values, and all will be well. The charts and display values can continue to use local times.

This approach does have a flaw in that the report needs to be edited to account for Daylight Savings Time/Standard Time transitions. Taking the Power Query approach allows us to use parameters, which can be changed in the service without editing the data model, but that still requires manual intervention. I would really like to see the ability of Power BI to understand time zones by name, and to be able to account for Daylight savings time changes. In other word to call a function with a time, and a time zone name parameter, and have it return a time using -4 as an offset in the summer, and -5 in the winter. In the absence of that, this approach will have to do.

One Comment

  1. Interesting John. Good applications in Agriculture.

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